Teachers Need Teachers Podcast https://teachersneedteachers.com/episode-archives/ the podcast for new teachers Tue, 12 Nov 2019 16:55:53 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.2.4 the podcast for new teachers Kim Lepre clean episodic Kim Lepre kimberly.lepre@gmail.com kimberly.lepre@gmail.com (Kim Lepre) the podcast for new teachers Teachers Need Teachers Podcast https://teachersneedteachers.com/wp-content/plugins/powerpress/rss_default.jpghttps://teachersneedteachers.com/episode-archives/ TnT 86 How Open Middle Math lessons can get your students addicted to mathhttps://teachersneedteachers.com/tnt-86-how-open-middle-math-lessons-can-get-your-students-addicted-to-math/ Mon, 11 Nov 2019 07:00:40 +0000 https://teachersneedteachers.com/?p=2027 https://teachersneedteachers.com/tnt-86-how-open-middle-math-lessons-can-get-your-students-addicted-to-math/#respond https://teachersneedteachers.com/tnt-86-how-open-middle-math-lessons-can-get-your-students-addicted-to-math/feed/ 0 Math tends to be one of those subjects that kids either understand and love or are completely befuddled by and hate. New math teachers often find themselves struggling between teaching procedures versus concepts. Unfortunately, there's still a lot of controversy in terms of which way leads to greater student success. In this interview, Robert Kaplinsky of openmiddle.com lets us in on why Common Core is given such a bad rap, the concept of Open Middle Math (and if you’re a math teacher who hasn’t heard of it, you’re in for a treat), and then we both get into the complicated discussion of grading. Where to find Robert: Open Middle Math RobertKaplinsky.com Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook Sign up for the New Educator Conference in either San Diego or Santa Clara, CA! Love this show? SUPPORT THE PODCAST! Want to ask a question and be featured on the podcast? Let your voice be heard! Click here to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by asking a question! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter Math tends to be one of those subjects that kids either understand and love or are completely befuddled by and hate. New math teachers often find themselves struggling between teaching procedures versus concepts. Unfortunately, Math tends to be one of those subjects that kids either understand and love or are completely befuddled by and hate. New math teachers often find themselves struggling between teaching procedures versus concepts. Unfortunately, there's still a lot of controversy in terms of which way leads to greater student success. In this interview, Robert Kaplinsky of openmiddle.com lets us in on why Common Core is given such a bad rap, the concept of Open Middle Math (and if you’re a math teacher who hasn’t heard of it, you’re in for a treat), and then we both get into the complicated discussion of grading.<br /> Where to find Robert:<br /> Open Middle Math<br /> <br /> RobertKaplinsky.com<br /> <br /> Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook<br /> Sign up for the New Educator Conference in either San Diego or Santa Clara, CA!<br /> Love this show?<br /> SUPPORT THE PODCAST!<br /> Want to ask a question and be featured on the podcast?<br /> Let your voice be heard! Click here to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by asking a question!<br /> <br /> Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more!<br /> Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show?<br /> You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com<br /> Connect with me<br /> <br /> Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher<br /> Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live<br /> Message me through Instagram or Twitter Kim Lepre clean 50:30 TnT 85 How to set yourself up for success with station rotationshttps://teachersneedteachers.com/tnt-85-how-to-set-yourself-up-for-success-with-station-rotations/ Mon, 04 Nov 2019 07:00:15 +0000 https://teachersneedteachers.com/?p=2009 https://teachersneedteachers.com/tnt-85-how-to-set-yourself-up-for-success-with-station-rotations/#respond https://teachersneedteachers.com/tnt-85-how-to-set-yourself-up-for-success-with-station-rotations/feed/ 0 In the last episode, we covered why teachers should incorporate station rotations into their teaching, the logistics of planning for them, and how they can help with differentiation and classroom management. But if you've done them in the past and they were a disaster, chances are you didn't set them up properly. Today I bring Laura Kebart back to discuss how to use stations for small group instruction as well as how to train your students so that your stations are a success. Where you can find Laura: languageartsteachers.com The station rotation freebie: languageartsteachers.com/easystations Sign up for the New Educator Conference in either San Diego or Santa Clara, CA! Love this show? SUPPORT THE PODCAST! Want to ask a question and be featured on the podcast? Let your voice be heard! Click here to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by asking a question! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter In the last episode, we covered why teachers should incorporate station rotations into their teaching, the logistics of planning for them, and how they can help with differentiation and classroom management. In the last episode, we covered why teachers should incorporate station rotations into their teaching, the logistics of planning for them, and how they can help with differentiation and classroom management. But if you've done them in the past and they were a disaster, chances are you didn't set them up properly. Today I bring Laura Kebart back to discuss how to use stations for small group instruction as well as how to train your students so that your stations are a success.<br /> Where you can find Laura:<br /> languageartsteachers.com<br /> The station rotation freebie:<br /> languageartsteachers.com/easystations<br /> Sign up for the New Educator Conference in either San Diego or Santa Clara, CA!<br /> Love this show?<br /> SUPPORT THE PODCAST!<br /> Want to ask a question and be featured on the podcast?<br /> Let your voice be heard! Click here to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by asking a question!<br /> <br /> Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more!<br /> Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show?<br /> You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com<br /> Connect with me<br /> <br /> Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher<br /> Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live<br /> Message me through Instagram or Twitter Kim Lepre clean 38:11 TnT 84 Why station rotations can positively impact your teaching practicehttps://teachersneedteachers.com/tnt-84-why-station-rotations-can-positively-impact-your-teaching-practice/ Mon, 28 Oct 2019 07:00:37 +0000 https://teachersneedteachers.com/?p=2008 https://teachersneedteachers.com/tnt-84-why-station-rotations-can-positively-impact-your-teaching-practice/#respond https://teachersneedteachers.com/tnt-84-why-station-rotations-can-positively-impact-your-teaching-practice/feed/ 0 A lot of teachers have different strategies for cooperative learning or to facilitate more engaging learning experiences. One that most know of and not enough try is station rotations. I'd seen these done with various teachers and even dipped my toe in a bit, but I wanted to know more about how to do them effectively. So I invited my friend, Laura Kebart from languageartsteachers.com, who is an expert on making stations fit within the context of your class. We go into what stations are, why we should use them, how to group students, how to create an assignment that lends itself to stations, how to make them work in a 45-minute period, classroom management, AND grading. Where you can find Laura: languageartsteachers.com Sign up for the New Educator Conference in either San Diego or Santa Clara, CA! Love this show? SUPPORT THE PODCAST! Want to ask a question and be featured on the podcast? Let your voice be heard! Click here to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by asking a question! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter Kim   I'm super excited about this episode because not only do I want to learn more about stations, I want to try to convince you to give them a shot as well. I'm always looking for ways for students to stay engaged and to create deeper learning experiences for them. And I think stations are really going to change up how I do things.    Kim   Well, thank you, Laura, so much for being on the podcast. I really appreciate you taking the time to do this.   Laura   Oh my gosh, I'm so happy to be here. Kim, happy to talk to you and we're ready to go. Yeah.   Kim   So about a year ago, actually, you were on the podcast. And you know, we have you back with For those who haven't heard that episode that you were on, could you tell my listeners more about what you do?   Laura   Oh, sure, yes. So I serve middle school English language arts teachers by providing full curriculum and instructional coaching. So that involves embedding, reading, writing, speaking, listening all those skills into the lessons, and I work with teachers all across the country at this point who either have no resources, or they have too many resources and lots of flexibility. And you know, teachers who were told Oh, just teach the standard, you'll be fine. Well, what does that mean?    Laura   And so I provide those resources and that instructional coaching to them and I do it in a way that's completely realistic. I really take the whole teacher into account when I'm providing advice or instructional coaching in other words, what's your what's going on with your family at home? What do you like to do on the weekends? What's happening in your life outside of school, so that I'm always providing information and resources that make sense for them where they are.    Laura   So I will never tell a teacher you need to put together this whole project, it's going to, you know, you ever been to those workshops and conferences and you think, wait, if I was actually going to do that, that would take hours every night, right? And, you know, so I just I never offer that kind of advice. So I serve in a very realistic way. The teachers you know, who are in our membership, so I serve these teachers through membership so that I can provide consistent support and resources every month all year long.   Kim   And what's great about that is I've always recommended to my listeners, especially when they're starting out to not create their own lessons, because it just it takes a long time, A lot of teachers have different strategies for cooperative learning or to facilitate more engaging learning experiences. One that most know of and not enough try is station rotations. I'd seen these done with various teachers and even dipped my toe in... A lot of teachers have different strategies for cooperative learning or to facilitate more engaging learning experiences. One that most know of and not enough try is station rotations. I'd seen these done with various teachers and even dipped my toe in a bit, but I wanted to know more about how to do them effectively. So I invited my friend, Laura Kebart from languageartsteachers.com, who is an expert on making stations fit within the context of your class. We go into what stations are, why we should use them, how to group students, how to create an assignment that lends itself to stations, how to make them work in a 45-minute period, classroom management, AND grading.<br /> Where you can find Laura:<br /> languageartsteachers.com<br /> Sign up for the New Educator Conference in either San Diego or Santa Clara, CA!<br /> Love this show?<br /> SUPPORT THE PODCAST!<br /> Want to ask a question and be featured on the podcast?<br /> Let your voice be heard! Click here to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by asking a question!<br /> <br /> Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more!<br /> Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show?<br /> You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com<br /> Connect with me<br /> <br /> Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher<br /> Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live<br /> Message me through Instagram or Twitter<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Kim  <br /> <br /> I'm super excited about this episode because not only do I want to learn more about stations, I want to try to convince you to give them a shot as well. I'm always looking for ways for students to stay engaged and to create deeper learning experiences for them. And I think stations are really going to change up how I do things. <br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> Kim  <br /> <br /> Well, thank you, Laura, so much for being on the podcast. I really appreciate you taking the time to do this.<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> Laura  <br /> <br /> Oh my gosh, I'm so happy to be here. Kim, happy to talk to you and we're ready to go. Yeah.<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> Kim  <br /> <br /> So about a year ago, actually, you were on the podcast. And you know, we have you back with For those who haven't heard that episode that you were on, could you tell my listeners more about what you do?<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> Laura  <br /> <br /> Oh, sure, yes. So I serve middle school English language arts teachers by providing full curriculum and instructional coaching. So that involves embedding, reading, writing, speaking, listening all those skills into the lessons, and I work with teachers all across the country at this point who either have no resources, or they have too many resources and lots of flexibility. And you know, teachers who were told Oh, just teach the standard, you'll be fine. Well, what does that mean? <br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> Laura  <br /> <br /> And so I provide those resources and that instructional coaching to them and I do it in a way that's completely realistic. I really take the whole teacher into account when I'm providing advice or instructional coaching in other words, what's your what's going on with your family at home? What do you like to do on the weekends? What's happening in your life outside of school, so that I'm always providing information and resources that make sense for them where they are. <br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> Laura  <br /> <br /> So I will never tell a teacher you need to put together this whole project, it's going to, you know, you ever been to those workshops and conferences and you think, wait, if I was actually going to do that, that would take hours every night, right? And, you know, so I just I never offer that kind of advice. So I serve in a very realistic way. The teachers you know, Kim Lepre clean 38:11 TnT 83 The founders of Prac-E tell us how new teachers can survive in difficult schoolshttps://teachersneedteachers.com/tnt-83-the-founders-of-prac-e-tell-us-how-new-teachers-can-survive-in-difficult-schools/ Mon, 21 Oct 2019 07:00:08 +0000 https://teachersneedteachers.com/?p=2001 https://teachersneedteachers.com/tnt-83-the-founders-of-prac-e-tell-us-how-new-teachers-can-survive-in-difficult-schools/#respond https://teachersneedteachers.com/tnt-83-the-founders-of-prac-e-tell-us-how-new-teachers-can-survive-in-difficult-schools/feed/ 0 New teachers come out of their practicum excited and ready to dive head-first into teaching. But they often run into the problem of trying to decide which schools to teach at, being a positive force for students with difficult home lives, and a long list of other serious issues. How do they know if a school is right for them? How can they handle being a long-term substitute or start in the middle of the year? In this special interview with Liam Auliciems and Scott Harding, the founders of Prac-E, we answer these questions plus discuss what to do if your school has a toxic culture. Where to find Prac-E: Website/Blog: www.prac-e.com  YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCjYZnQTe_bVQz4TbyhmxwZA Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/praceproductions/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/prac_e/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/prac_e LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/prac-eproductions/ Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/prac-e-podcast/id1353493632?mt=2 Sign up for the New Educator Conference in either San Diego or Santa Clara, CA! Love this show? SUPPORT THE PODCAST! Want to ask a question and be featured on the podcast? Let your voice be heard! Click here to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by asking a question! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter Kim   I have a fun and informative interview with Liam Auliciems and Scott Harding, the co-founders of Prac-E. I was originally in contact with Liam through our mutual respect for each other's work since we both have a mission of helping new teachers. I was particularly impressed with their symposiums for new teachers that Scott and Liam will talk more about, as well as all of the tips and hacks they provide through different types of media. I really enjoy the videos they put on Instagram and YouTube so you guys should definitely check those out, too.   Now a little bit about them. Scott is a veteran teacher of more than 22 years and he's taught in every type of school out there both in his native England, as well as Australia where he's lived for quite some time. He's passionate about mentoring beginning teachers and gives us a lot of practical advice on this episode that I know you're going to find valuable.  And Liam, who used to be one of Scott's students, is an education entrepreneur. academic researcher, registered teacher, and a post-grad master student. His teaching experience ranges from being a residential tutor in a private school to volunteering to support some of Australia's lowest socioeconomic students. And you'll hear him go into that when we have our conversation.  As the three of us get into the thick of it, you'll notice that there are a surprisingly large number of parallels between the problems we face here in the US with Australia, the same teacher shortages, the same frustrations with pre-service programs, the same concerns about the work environment and classroom management are there in two completely different continents across the ocean. Now, I won't make you wait any longer for this. So here's my interview with Liam and Scott. Thank you, Scott, and Liam, for being on the podcast. I really appreciate you taking the time all the way from Australia.   Prac-E   Thank you very much. We're very happy to be here. It's amazing when we started off this idea a few years ago the last thing that could ever have imagined that we would have enough slides right someone in America is Dr. Have no idea so it's amazing so thank you so much for having us.   Kim   New teachers come out of their practicum excited and ready to dive head-first into teaching. But they often run into the problem of trying to decide which schools to teach at, being a positive force for students with difficult home lives, New teachers come out of their practicum excited and ready to dive head-first into teaching. But they often run into the problem of trying to decide which schools to teach at, being a positive force for students with difficult home lives, and a long list of other serious issues. How do they know if a school is right for them? How can they handle being a long-term substitute or start in the middle of the year? In this special interview with Liam Auliciems and Scott Harding, the founders of Prac-E, we answer these questions plus discuss what to do if your school has a toxic culture.<br /> Where to find Prac-E:<br /> <br /> Website/Blog: www.prac-e.com <br /> YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCjYZnQTe_bVQz4TbyhmxwZA<br /> Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/praceproductions/<br /> Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/prac_e/<br /> Twitter: https://twitter.com/prac_e<br /> LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/prac-eproductions/<br /> Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/prac-e-podcast/id1353493632?mt=2<br /> <br /> Sign up for the New Educator Conference in either San Diego or Santa Clara, CA!<br /> Love this show?<br /> SUPPORT THE PODCAST!<br /> Want to ask a question and be featured on the podcast?<br /> Let your voice be heard! Click here to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by asking a question!<br /> <br /> Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more!<br /> Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show?<br /> You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com<br /> Connect with me<br /> <br /> Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher<br /> Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live<br /> Message me through Instagram or Twitter<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Kim  <br /> <br /> I have a fun and informative interview with Liam Auliciems and Scott Harding, the co-founders of Prac-E. I was originally in contact with Liam through our mutual respect for each other's work since we both have a mission of helping new teachers. I was particularly impressed with their symposiums for new teachers that Scott and Liam will talk more about, as well as all of the tips and hacks they provide through different types of media. I really enjoy the videos they put on Instagram and YouTube so you guys should definitely check those out, too.<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> Now a little bit about them. Scott is a veteran teacher of more than 22 years and he's taught in every type of school out there both in his native England, as well as Australia where he's lived for quite some time. He's passionate about mentoring beginning teachers and gives us a lot of practical advice on this episode that I know you're going to find valuable. <br /> <br /> And Liam, who used to be one of Scott's students, is an education entrepreneur. academic researcher, registered teacher, and a post-grad master student. His teaching experience ranges from being a residential tutor in a private school to volunteering to support some of Australia's lowest socioeconomic students. And you'll hear him go into that when we have our conversation. <br /> <br /> As the three of us get into the thick of it, you'll notice that there are a surprisingly large number of parallels between the problems we face here in the US with Australia, the same teacher shortages, the same frustrations with pre-service programs, the same concerns about the work environment and classroom management are there in two completely different continents across the ocean. Now, I won't make you wait any longer for this. So here's my interview with Liam and Scott. Thank you, Scott, and Liam, for being on the podcast. I really appreciate you taking the time all the way from Australia.<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> Prac-E  <br /> <br /> Thank you very much. We're very happy to be here. Kim Lepre clean 49:08 TnT 82 What teachers can do to foster LGBTQ inclusivity in the classroomhttps://teachersneedteachers.com/tnt-82-what-teachers-can-do-to-foster-lgbtq-inclusivity-in-the-classroom/ Mon, 14 Oct 2019 07:00:55 +0000 https://teachersneedteachers.com/?p=1986 https://teachersneedteachers.com/tnt-82-what-teachers-can-do-to-foster-lgbtq-inclusivity-in-the-classroom/#respond https://teachersneedteachers.com/tnt-82-what-teachers-can-do-to-foster-lgbtq-inclusivity-in-the-classroom/feed/ 0 New teachers often come into teaching already supporting LGBTQ rights and have good intentions to demonstrate this support but can fall short on implementation. How can they start eradicating cisnormativity and heteronormativity that has been institutionalized for many students? How can they create a safe space that goes beyond rainbow flags and stickers? In part 2 of my interview with Cody Miller, we continue to discuss how to support queer educators in our schools, how to deal with derogatory slurs involving being gay, and how non-English and history teachers can do their part to be LGBTQ allies. Where you can find Cody: Twitter Links mentioned in this episode: Reading the Rainbow Article in Slate Sign up for the New Educator Conference in either San Diego or Santa Clara, CA! Love this show? SUPPORT THE PODCAST! Want to ask a question and be featured on the podcast? Let your voice be heard! Click here to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by asking a question! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter Kim   Cody Miller is an assistant professor of English education at the College at Brockport, State University of New York. Prior to that he taught high school English for seven years in Florida. And he's teaching and research focus on the various ways students construct their identities in LA classrooms with a specific emphasis on how a young adult literature influences students worldviews, and meaning-making capacities. He's also led professional development sessions that focus on writing instruction and developing inclusive spaces for LGBT students. And currently, he is the chair of the National Council of Teachers of English LGBT q Advisory Committee. And he was awarded the Teaching Tolerance Award for Excellence in Teaching in 2016, and recognized as one of the inner National Literacy associations 30, under 30, and 2019. So now that you know more about Cody, here's our conversation.    And how do we have this conversation with our LGBT q colleagues and let them know that we support it? I mean, it might isn't going to be jarring if I came up to you and say I support LGBT q out of nowhere. Or, oh, hey, I went to the Pride Parade or, you know, how can I let them also know that there's, there's someone in the staff that that is there to champion them? Yeah.   Cody   It's, like, in a perfect world, you don't want that. But also, like, I get that all the time, right. Like, you know, like, I've had called well-intentioned colleagues, right, like, I just went to a wedding and it was like, two grooms. And it's like, Oh, great. Like, I just want to throw everything was the bride and groom. Or, like, you know, people are like, oh, like, my  kid is gay? You know, I'll be like, oh, like my mom straight. It's wild.    I don't want to make a jest of that, because it really does come from a good space. But your question is really good. Because I as a teacher, whenever we hired new teachers, the first question that was always on my mind is like, is this someone who's going to like, you know, be a bigot? Or is this someone who is going to be supportive? And that's a real question that weighs heavily on LGBTQ educators.    So why can you do I think kind of, similarly, what we had talked about earlier, I think having some kind of visible sign that you're supportive, is really important. I think having material in your classroom. You know, I think we're in a socially mediated world. And we always look up people on social media, when they get hired a new face, right.    New teachers often come into teaching already supporting LGBTQ rights and have good intentions to demonstrate this support but can fall short on implementation. How can they start eradicating cisnormativity and heteronormativity that has been instituti... New teachers often come into teaching already supporting LGBTQ rights and have good intentions to demonstrate this support but can fall short on implementation. How can they start eradicating cisnormativity and heteronormativity that has been institutionalized for many students? How can they create a safe space that goes beyond rainbow flags and stickers? In part 2 of my interview with Cody Miller, we continue to discuss how to support queer educators in our schools, how to deal with derogatory slurs involving being gay, and how non-English and history teachers can do their part to be LGBTQ allies.<br /> Where you can find Cody:<br /> Twitter<br /> <br /> Links mentioned in this episode:<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Reading the Rainbow<br /> Article in Slate<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Sign up for the New Educator Conference in either San Diego or Santa Clara, CA!<br /> Love this show?<br /> SUPPORT THE PODCAST!<br /> Want to ask a question and be featured on the podcast?<br /> Let your voice be heard! Click here to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by asking a question!<br /> <br /> Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more!<br /> Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show?<br /> You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com<br /> Connect with me<br /> <br /> Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher<br /> Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live<br /> Message me through Instagram or Twitter<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Kim  <br /> <br /> Cody Miller is an assistant professor of English education at the College at Brockport, State University of New York. Prior to that he taught high school English for seven years in Florida. And he's teaching and research focus on the various ways students construct their identities in LA classrooms with a specific emphasis on how a young adult literature influences students worldviews, and meaning-making capacities. He's also led professional development sessions that focus on writing instruction and developing inclusive spaces for LGBT students. And currently, he is the chair of the National Council of Teachers of English LGBT q Advisory Committee. And he was awarded the Teaching Tolerance Award for Excellence in Teaching in 2016, and recognized as one of the inner National Literacy associations 30, under 30, and 2019. So now that you know more about Cody, here's our conversation. <br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> And how do we have this conversation with our LGBT q colleagues and let them know that we support it? I mean, it might isn't going to be jarring if I came up to you and say I support LGBT q out of nowhere. Or, oh, hey, I went to the Pride Parade or, you know, how can I let them also know that there's, there's someone in the staff that that is there to champion them? Yeah.<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> Cody  <br /> <br /> It's, like, in a perfect world, you don't want that. But also, like, I get that all the time, right. Like, you know, like, I've had called well-intentioned colleagues, right, like, I just went to a wedding and it was like, two grooms. And it's like, Oh, great. Like, I just want to throw everything was the bride and groom. Or, like, you know, people are like, oh, like, my  kid is gay? You know, I'll be like, oh, like my mom straight. It's wild. <br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> I don't want to make a jest of that, because it really does come from a good space. But your question is really good. Because I as a teacher, whenever we hired new teachers, the first question that was always on my mind is like, is this someone who's going to like, you know, be a bigot? Or is this someone who is going to be supportive? And that's a real question that weighs heavily on LGBTQ educators. <br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> So why can you do I think kind of, similarly, Kim Lepre clean 38:54 TnT 81 How to support LGBTQ educators and students in our schoolshttps://teachersneedteachers.com/tnt-81-how-to-support-lgbtq-educators-and-students-in-our-schools/ Mon, 07 Oct 2019 07:00:38 +0000 https://teachersneedteachers.com/?p=1982 https://teachersneedteachers.com/tnt-81-how-to-support-lgbtq-educators-and-students-in-our-schools/#respond https://teachersneedteachers.com/tnt-81-how-to-support-lgbtq-educators-and-students-in-our-schools/feed/ 0 Even though it's 2019 and it seems like there would be more acceptance and inclusion of the LGBTQ people, there is still a lot of work to do. And while I personally support those in the community, I wanted to know more about how I can do a better job as a teacher. So on Part 1 of my interview with Cody Miller, an assistant professor in New York who gives professional development on these issues,  we discuss what has and hasn't improved with schools, how cisgender and hetero educators can support their queer colleagues and students, and how to address those that don’t approve of the LGBTQ community. Where you can find Cody: Twitter Links mentioned in this episode: Importance of being visible Doing what you can Queering critical literacy and numeracy Sign up for the New Educator Conference in either San Diego or Santa Clara, CA! Love this show? SUPPORT THE PODCAST! Want to ask a question and be featured on the podcast? Let your voice be heard! Click here to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by asking a question! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter Kim Cody Miller is an assistant professor of English education at the College at Brockport State University of New York. Prior to that he taught high school English for seven years in Florida. His teaching and research focus on the various ways students construct their identities in LA classrooms with a specific emphasis of how young adult literature influences students, worldviews, and meaning making capacities. He's also led professional development sessions that focus on writing instruction and developing inclusive spaces for LGBTQ students. And currently, he is the chair of the National Council of Teachers of English or NCTE LGBTQ Advisory Committee. Cody was awarded the Teaching Tolerance Award for Excellence in Teaching in 2016 and recognized as one of the International literacy associations 30 under 30 in 2019. So now that you know more about Cody, here's my conversation with him. Cody, thank you so much for being on the podcast. I really appreciate you taking the time to do this. Cody Thank you so much. I'm super excited to be here. Kim Now you've done some work with teaching tolerance and track to you even received an award and now you're working with the National Council of Teachers of English on LGBT q issues. So can you talk about this important role that you have within both of the groups. Cody Sure. So for teaching tolerance, I was awarded their teaching award back in 2016. And since then I've been working on their advisory board. So on that board, teaching tolerance, his mission is pretty broad, right and includes all grades and content areas. So it takes a very generalist approach to education. The stuff I particularly focused on for teaching tolerance, and what I've written is by and large, discussing LGBT q topics and classes, as well as looking at kind of the politics of education and, and what's happening in schools based on what's happening in our broader political atmosphere. And I would say that teaching tolerance in general is much more like broadly focused, right, so they have like a best guides for supporting LGBTQ youth that spans K12 all content areas, including administrators as well, so really kind of a holistic view of schools. So that's kind of my work. That's my work there. Whereas in NCTE is more focused on English teachers, of course, and that spans k 12, including higher ed, but it is really focused on English as a subject area, which is what my background is in. Even though it's 2019 and it seems like there would be more acceptance and inclusion of the LGBTQ people, there is still a lot of work to do. And while I personally support those in the community, I wanted to know more about how I can do a better job a... Even though it's 2019 and it seems like there would be more acceptance and inclusion of the LGBTQ people, there is still a lot of work to do. And while I personally support those in the community, I wanted to know more about how I can do a better job as a teacher. So on Part 1 of my interview with Cody Miller, an assistant professor in New York who gives professional development on these issues,  we discuss what has and hasn't improved with schools, how cisgender and hetero educators can support their queer colleagues and students, and how to address those that don’t approve of the LGBTQ community.<br /> Where you can find Cody:<br /> Twitter<br /> <br /> Links mentioned in this episode:<br /> <br /> Importance of being visible<br /> Doing what you can<br /> Queering critical literacy and numeracy<br /> <br /> Sign up for the New Educator Conference in either San Diego or Santa Clara, CA!<br /> Love this show?<br /> SUPPORT THE PODCAST!<br /> Want to ask a question and be featured on the podcast?<br /> Let your voice be heard! Click here to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by asking a question!<br /> <br /> Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more!<br /> Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show?<br /> You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com<br /> Connect with me<br /> <br /> Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher<br /> Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live<br /> Message me through Instagram or Twitter<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Kim<br /> Cody Miller is an assistant professor of English education at the College at Brockport State University of New York. Prior to that he taught high school English for seven years in Florida.<br /> <br /> His teaching and research focus on the various ways students construct their identities in LA classrooms with a specific emphasis of how young adult literature influences students, worldviews, and meaning making capacities.<br /> <br /> He's also led professional development sessions that focus on writing instruction and developing inclusive spaces for LGBTQ students. And currently, he is the chair of the National Council of Teachers of English or NCTE LGBTQ Advisory Committee. Cody was awarded the Teaching Tolerance Award for Excellence in Teaching in 2016 and recognized as one of the International literacy associations 30 under 30 in 2019. So now that you know more about Cody, here's my conversation with him.<br /> <br /> Cody, thank you so much for being on the podcast. I really appreciate you taking the time to do this.<br /> <br /> Cody<br /> Thank you so much. I'm super excited to be here.<br /> <br /> Kim<br /> Now you've done some work with teaching tolerance and track to you even received an award and now you're working with the National Council of Teachers of English on LGBT q issues. So can you talk about this important role that you have within both of the groups.<br /> <br /> Cody<br /> Sure. So for teaching tolerance, I was awarded their teaching award back in 2016. And since then I've been working on their advisory board. So on that board, teaching tolerance, his mission is pretty broad, right and includes all grades and content areas. So it takes a very generalist approach to education.<br /> <br /> The stuff I particularly focused on for teaching tolerance, and what I've written is by and large, discussing LGBT q topics and classes, as well as looking at kind of the politics of education and, and what's happening in schools based on what's happening in our broader political atmosphere. And I would say that teaching tolerance in general is much more like broadly focused, right, so they have like a best guides for supporting LGBTQ youth that spans K12 all content areas, including administrators as well, so really kind of a holistic view of schools.<br /> Kim Lepre clean 37:48 TnT 80 Teachers drowning in student loan debt can save so much money by doing thishttps://teachersneedteachers.com/tnt-80-teachers-drowning-in-student-loan-debt-can-save-so-much-money-by-doing-this/ Mon, 30 Sep 2019 07:00:34 +0000 https://teachersneedteachers.com/?p=1969 https://teachersneedteachers.com/tnt-80-teachers-drowning-in-student-loan-debt-can-save-so-much-money-by-doing-this/#respond https://teachersneedteachers.com/tnt-80-teachers-drowning-in-student-loan-debt-can-save-so-much-money-by-doing-this/feed/ 0 Student loan debt is no joke, and it creates so much anxiety for just about everyone, ESPECIALLY newer teachers. Programs like Teacher Loan Forgiveness promise to help with this burden, but it barely helps to bring down the tens of thousands of dollars in debt that teachers have. And misinformation about the best way to pay back these loans results in teachers losing thousands of dollars. Why doesn't anyone tell us about this? Why is it so complicated? In this second part of my conversation with Travis Hornsby from the Student Loan Planner, we get down to the details, and he goes as far as to crunch some numbers so that you can get a really clear idea of just how much you can save. Where you can find Travis The Student Loan Planner website The Student Loan Planner Podcast More information on what we discussed today Sign up for the New Educator Conference in either San Diego or Santa Clara, CA! Love this show? SUPPORT THE PODCAST! Want to ask a question and be featured on the podcast? Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by asking a question! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter You can help make this podcast better! Please click the button below to complete this survey so that I can discuss the topics that matter to you most! TAKE ME TO THE SURVEY! Thank you so much for joining me today, I really appreciate it. I’m super excited for this second part of my interview with Travis. As I mentioned in the introduction, Travis is from studentloanplanner.com and the Student Loan Planner podcast. I can’t wait for you to learn more about how you can get out from under the burden of student loan debt. Travis founded Student Loan Planner after helping his physician wife navigate ridiculously complex student loan repayment decisions. To date, he’s consulted on almost $500 million in student debt personally, more than anyone else in the country. He is a Chartered Financial Analyst and brings his background as a former bond trader trading billions of dollars. Before we get into part 2, I wanted remind you guys know about an upcoming conference JUST for new teachers. It’s called the New Educator Weekend, and it’s being held in two locations: in San Diego from December 6-8 and Santa Clara, CA from February 21-23. These conferences have everything that you need to be successful in your first few years of teaching with sessions covering topics like classroom management, IEPs, working with colleagues, admin, and parents, common core and state standards, and how to build your teaching career. SO MUCH good stuff you guys, and you KNOW you need it! As a bonus, I’ll be at both of those conferences both as a presenter and exhibitor for this podcast, so I definitely encourage you to sign up. I’d LOVELOVELOVE to meet you and hear about how your first years are going! So if you DO plan on going, be sure to message me on Instagram or email me so that I can look out for you and we can meet up! For more information and to sign up, head over to teachersneedteachers.com/conference, where you’ll see information about both the southern on in San Diego and northern one in Santa Clara. Thank you so much for joining me today, I really appreciate it. I’m super excited for this second part of my interview with Travis. As I mentioned in the introduction, Travis is from studentloanplanner.com and the Student Loan Planner podcast. I can’t wait for you to learn more about how you can get out from under the burden of student loan debt. Travis founded Student Loan Planner after helping his ph... Student loan debt is no joke, and it creates so much anxiety for just about everyone, ESPECIALLY newer teachers. Programs like Teacher Loan Forgiveness promise to help with this burden, but it barely helps to bring down the tens of thousands of dollars... Student loan debt is no joke, and it creates so much anxiety for just about everyone, ESPECIALLY newer teachers. Programs like Teacher Loan Forgiveness promise to help with this burden, but it barely helps to bring down the tens of thousands of dollars in debt that teachers have. And misinformation about the best way to pay back these loans results in teachers losing thousands of dollars. Why doesn't anyone tell us about this? Why is it so complicated? In this second part of my conversation with Travis Hornsby from the Student Loan Planner, we get down to the details, and he goes as far as to crunch some numbers so that you can get a really clear idea of just how much you can save.<br /> Where you can find Travis<br /> <br /> The Student Loan Planner website<br /> The Student Loan Planner Podcast<br /> More information on what we discussed today<br /> <br /> Sign up for the New Educator Conference in either San Diego or Santa Clara, CA!<br /> Love this show?<br /> SUPPORT THE PODCAST!<br /> Want to ask a question and be featured on the podcast?<br /> Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by asking a question!<br /> <br /> Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more!<br /> Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show?<br /> You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com<br /> Connect with me<br /> <br /> Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher<br /> Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live<br /> Message me through Instagram or Twitter<br /> <br /> You can help make this podcast better! Please click the button below to complete this survey so that I can discuss the topics that matter to you most!<br /> TAKE ME TO THE SURVEY!<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Thank you so much for joining me today, I really appreciate it. I’m super excited for this second part of my interview with Travis. As I mentioned in the introduction, Travis is from studentloanplanner.com and the Student Loan Planner podcast. I can’t wait for you to learn more about how you can get out from under the burden of student loan debt.<br /> <br /> Travis founded Student Loan Planner after helping his physician wife navigate ridiculously complex student loan repayment decisions. To date, he’s consulted on almost $500 million in student debt personally, more than anyone else in the country. He is a Chartered Financial Analyst and brings his background as a former bond trader trading billions of dollars.<br /> <br /> Before we get into part 2, I wanted remind you guys know about an upcoming conference JUST for new teachers. It’s called the New Educator Weekend, and it’s being held in two locations: in San Diego from December 6-8 and Santa Clara, CA from February 21-23. These conferences have everything that you need to be successful in your first few years of teaching with sessions covering topics like classroom management, IEPs, working with colleagues, admin, and parents, common core and state standards, and how to build your teaching career. SO MUCH good stuff you guys, and you KNOW you need it!<br /> <br /> As a bonus, I’ll be at both of those conferences both as a presenter and exhibitor for this podcast, so I definitely encourage you to sign up. I’d LOVELOVELOVE to meet you and hear about how your first years are going! So if you DO plan on going, be sure to message me on Instagram or email me so that I can look out for you and we can meet up!<br /> <br /> For more information and to sign up, head over to teachersneedteachers.com/conference, where you’ll see information about both the southern on in San Diego and northern one in Santa Clara.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Thank you so much for joining me today, I really appreciate it. I’m super excited for this second part of my interview with Travis. As I mentioned in the introduction, Kim Lepre clean 38:32 TnT 79 The best and least expensive way to pay off your student loanshttps://teachersneedteachers.com/tnt-79-the-best-and-least-expensive-way-to-pay-off-your-student-loans/ Mon, 23 Sep 2019 07:00:42 +0000 https://teachersneedteachers.com/?p=1963 https://teachersneedteachers.com/tnt-79-the-best-and-least-expensive-way-to-pay-off-your-student-loans/#respond https://teachersneedteachers.com/tnt-79-the-best-and-least-expensive-way-to-pay-off-your-student-loans/feed/ 0 The large majority of new teachers have some form of student loan debt are probably trying to figure out how they’re going to pay it off with their new salary. What if I told you that some of you could pay as little as $100 a month AND have all of your debt taken care of in 10 years? Sounds too good to be true, right? In this episode, Travis Hornsby from the Student Loan Planner tells us not only why we’re entitled to do this but also how we can save tens of thousands of dollars on our debt.  Where you can find Travis The Student Loan Planner website The Student Loan Planner Podcast More information on what we discussed today Sign up for the New Educator Conference in either San Diego or Santa Clara, CA! Love this show? SUPPORT THE PODCAST! Want to ask a question and be featured on the podcast? Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by asking a question! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter You can help make this podcast better! Please click the button below to complete this survey so that I can discuss the topics that matter to you most! TAKE ME TO THE SURVEY! I’m so happy you joined me today since I have a seriously valuable episode that you definitely want to stick around until the end for. As I mentioned in the introduction, Travis Hornsby from studentloanplanner.com and the Student Loan Planner podcast is with me to discuss how teachers can get out from under the burden of student loan debt. Travis founded Student Loan Planner after helping his physician wife navigate ridiculously complex student loan repayment decisions. To date, he’s consulted on almost $500 million in student debt personally, more than anyone else in the country. He is a Chartered Financial Analyst and brings his background as a former bond trader trading billions of dollars. Before we dive into the interview, I wanted to let you guys know about an upcoming conference JUST for new teachers. It’s called the New Educator Weekend, and it’s being held in two locations: in San Diego from December 6-8 and Santa Clara, CA from February 21-23. These conferences have everything that you need to be successful in your first few years of teaching with sessions covering topics like classroom management, IEPs, working with colleagues, admin, and parents, common core and state standards, and how to build your teaching career. I’ll be at both of those conferences both as a presenter and exhibitor for this podcast, so I definitely encourage you to sign up. I’d LOVELOVELOVE to meet you and hear about how your first years are going! For more information and to sign up, head over to teachersneedteachers.com/conference, where you’ll see information about both the southern on in San Diego and northern one in Santa Clara.   Kim Well, thank you, Travis for being on the podcast. I really appreciate it. Travis Thanks for having me, Kim excited. Kim Now, I thought your story about helping your wife figure out how to pay her six figure student loan debt was really cute. And I'm pretty sure that every person who listens to my podcast has student loan debt. So they're definitely going to be interested in hearing about how they can get out from under this just heavy burden of debt. But just some background for so why were student loan forgiveness programs created in the first place? Travis Well it was to incentivize people to do jobs that pay less than other opportunities Right. I mean, that's kind of the the main goal is to give somebody a little bit of, you know, The large majority of new teachers have some form of student loan debt are probably trying to figure out how they’re going to pay it off with their new salary. What if I told you that some of you could pay as little as $100 a month AND have all of your... The large majority of new teachers have some form of student loan debt are probably trying to figure out how they’re going to pay it off with their new salary. What if I told you that some of you could pay as little as $100 a month AND have all of your debt taken care of in 10 years? Sounds too good to be true, right? In this episode, Travis Hornsby from the Student Loan Planner tells us not only why we’re entitled to do this but also how we can save tens of thousands of dollars on our debt. <br /> Where you can find Travis<br /> <br /> The Student Loan Planner website<br /> The Student Loan Planner Podcast<br /> More information on what we discussed today<br /> <br /> Sign up for the New Educator Conference in either San Diego or Santa Clara, CA!<br /> Love this show?<br /> SUPPORT THE PODCAST!<br /> Want to ask a question and be featured on the podcast?<br /> Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by asking a question!<br /> <br /> Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more!<br /> Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show?<br /> You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com<br /> Connect with me<br /> <br /> Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher<br /> Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live<br /> Message me through Instagram or Twitter<br /> <br /> You can help make this podcast better! Please click the button below to complete this survey so that I can discuss the topics that matter to you most!<br /> TAKE ME TO THE SURVEY!<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> I’m so happy you joined me today since I have a seriously valuable episode that you definitely want to stick around until the end for. As I mentioned in the introduction, Travis Hornsby from studentloanplanner.com and the Student Loan Planner podcast is with me to discuss how teachers can get out from under the burden of student loan debt.<br /> <br /> Travis founded Student Loan Planner after helping his physician wife navigate ridiculously complex student loan repayment decisions. To date, he’s consulted on almost $500 million in student debt personally, more than anyone else in the country. He is a Chartered Financial Analyst and brings his background as a former bond trader trading billions of dollars.<br /> <br /> Before we dive into the interview, I wanted to let you guys know about an upcoming conference JUST for new teachers. It’s called the New Educator Weekend, and it’s being held in two locations: in San Diego from December 6-8 and Santa Clara, CA from February 21-23. These conferences have everything that you need to be successful in your first few years of teaching with sessions covering topics like classroom management, IEPs, working with colleagues, admin, and parents, common core and state standards, and how to build your teaching career.<br /> <br /> I’ll be at both of those conferences both as a presenter and exhibitor for this podcast, so I definitely encourage you to sign up. I’d LOVELOVELOVE to meet you and hear about how your first years are going!<br /> <br /> For more information and to sign up, head over to teachersneedteachers.com/conference, where you’ll see information about both the southern on in San Diego and northern one in Santa Clara.<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Kim<br /> Well, thank you, Travis for being on the podcast.<br /> <br /> I really appreciate it.<br /> <br /> Travis<br /> Thanks for having me, Kim excited.<br /> <br /> Kim<br /> Now, I thought your story about helping your wife figure out how to pay her six figure student loan debt was really cute. And I'm pretty sure that every person who listens to my podcast has student loan debt. So they're definitely going to be interested in hearing about how they can get out from under this just heavy burden of debt.<br /> Kim Lepre clean 33:37 TnT 78 What you need to understand about why teens to act the way they do in your classeshttps://teachersneedteachers.com/tnt-78-what-you-need-to-understand-about-why-teens-to-act-the-way-they-do-in-your-classes/ Mon, 16 Sep 2019 01:35:06 +0000 https://teachersneedteachers.com/?p=1954 https://teachersneedteachers.com/tnt-78-what-you-need-to-understand-about-why-teens-to-act-the-way-they-do-in-your-classes/#respond https://teachersneedteachers.com/tnt-78-what-you-need-to-understand-about-why-teens-to-act-the-way-they-do-in-your-classes/feed/ 0 Educators that teach teenagers have a unique challenge: their students want the same type of love and praise as before, but now they also want more autonomy. This means that the typical model of teachers setting the rules and students complying becomes more complicated as teenagers begin to question and challenge their teachers. What can new teachers do to ensure that they're respecting the needs of teenagers while still maintaining a positive learning environment? What should they do when their students begin to push back or become defiant? In today's episode, Andy Earle from Talking to Teens and I dive into the core motivations of teenage students so that teachers can frame their thinking and policies in a way that doesn't create more frustration and overwhelm for everyone. Where you can find Andy: Talking to Teens website Talking to Teens podcast Talking to Teens Instagram Love this show? SUPPORT THE PODCAST! Want to ask a question and be featured on the podcast? Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by asking a question! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter You can help make this podcast better! Please click the button below to complete this survey so that I can discuss the topics that matter to you most! TAKE ME TO THE SURVEY! Today on episode 78, I’m talking to Andy Earle from talkingtoteens.com and the Talk to Teens podcast. Since I’ve already done a couple of episodes dedicated to elementary teachers, I wanted an expert for those of us who teach teenagers. As I’ve mentioned before, a lot of what we do in the classroom in terms of policies needs to be appropriate for where our students are developmentally and socially. So I decided to ask Andy to join us and help us frame our students’ actions with the research he’s done on adolescents and teens. I’m pretty sure I’ve mentioned this, but I currently have a teenager in my house. While I’ve always taught seventh graders who happen to be 12-13 year-olds, having my own has been...a journey. As expected, there was a point where my daughter and I were butting heads. I was getting frustrated with her attitude, and she was annoyed with my bossiness and for being unreasonable. In a way, we were both right. But I was concerned that we were going to be battling like this all the way through middle school and college, which I really dreaded. I’d been used to being the one person she could talk to, and if we kept on arguing like this, I knew our relationship would be damaged. So I frantically searched for podcasts - which are my own professional and personal development - and stumbled upon Talking to Teens. You guys, it has been a GODSEND for me. I’ve taken a lot of the advice on the podcast and I have to say that I’ve been able to not only reframe how I perceive her actions but also communicate with my daughter more effectively. So it dawned on me that I should have Andy come on the podcast to talk about teens. He’s a researcher who studies adolescent behavior and parent-teen communication. His award-winning academic work with Loyola Marymount University’s HeadsUp Research Lab focuses on how parents and educators can positively influence defiant and rebellious teenagers. Raise your hand if you have some of those in your classes! His findings have been featured on hundreds of websites, TV news stations, and radio programs, including CNN, NPR, and The Huffington Post. He’s the Co-Founder of TalkingtoTeens.com and the host of the Talking to Teens podcast, where he speaks with leading experts from a variety of di... Educators that teach teenagers have a unique challenge: their students want the same type of love and praise as before, but now they also want more autonomy. This means that the typical model of teachers setting the rules and students complying becomes... Educators that teach teenagers have a unique challenge: their students want the same type of love and praise as before, but now they also want more autonomy. This means that the typical model of teachers setting the rules and students complying becomes more complicated as teenagers begin to question and challenge their teachers. What can new teachers do to ensure that they're respecting the needs of teenagers while still maintaining a positive learning environment? What should they do when their students begin to push back or become defiant? In today's episode, Andy Earle from Talking to Teens and I dive into the core motivations of teenage students so that teachers can frame their thinking and policies in a way that doesn't create more frustration and overwhelm for everyone.<br /> Where you can find Andy:<br /> <br /> Talking to Teens website<br /> Talking to Teens podcast<br /> Talking to Teens Instagram<br /> <br /> Love this show?<br /> SUPPORT THE PODCAST!<br /> Want to ask a question and be featured on the podcast?<br /> Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by asking a question!<br /> <br /> Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more!<br /> Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show?<br /> You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com<br /> Connect with me<br /> <br /> Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher<br /> Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live<br /> Message me through Instagram or Twitter<br /> <br /> You can help make this podcast better! Please click the button below to complete this survey so that I can discuss the topics that matter to you most!<br /> TAKE ME TO THE SURVEY!<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Today on episode 78, I’m talking to Andy Earle from talkingtoteens.com and the Talk to Teens podcast. Since I’ve already done a couple of episodes dedicated to elementary teachers, I wanted an expert for those of us who teach teenagers. As I’ve mentioned before, a lot of what we do in the classroom in terms of policies needs to be appropriate for where our students are developmentally and socially. So I decided to ask Andy to join us and help us frame our students’ actions with the research he’s done on adolescents and teens.<br /> <br /> I’m pretty sure I’ve mentioned this, but I currently have a teenager in my house. While I’ve always taught seventh graders who happen to be 12-13 year-olds, having my own has been...a journey.<br /> <br /> As expected, there was a point where my daughter and I were butting heads. I was getting frustrated with her attitude, and she was annoyed with my bossiness and for being unreasonable. In a way, we were both right.<br /> <br /> But I was concerned that we were going to be battling like this all the way through middle school and college, which I really dreaded. I’d been used to being the one person she could talk to, and if we kept on arguing like this, I knew our relationship would be damaged.<br /> <br /> So I frantically searched for podcasts - which are my own professional and personal development - and stumbled upon Talking to Teens. You guys, it has been a GODSEND for me. I’ve taken a lot of the advice on the podcast and I have to say that I’ve been able to not only reframe how I perceive her actions but also communicate with my daughter more effectively.<br /> <br /> So it dawned on me that I should have Andy come on the podcast to talk about teens. He’s a researcher who studies adolescent behavior and parent-teen communication. His award-winning academic work with Loyola Marymount University’s HeadsUp Research Lab focuses on how parents and educators can positively influence defiant and rebellious teenagers. Raise your hand if you have some of those in your classes!<br /> <br /> His findings have been featured on hundreds of websites, Kim Lepre clean 39:32 TnT 77 How to plan so you’re teaching everything you’re supposed tohttps://teachersneedteachers.com/tnt-77-how-to-plan-so-youre-teaching-everything-youre-supposed-to/ Mon, 09 Sep 2019 07:00:20 +0000 https://teachersneedteachers.com/?p=1946 https://teachersneedteachers.com/tnt-77-how-to-plan-so-youre-teaching-everything-youre-supposed-to/#respond https://teachersneedteachers.com/tnt-77-how-to-plan-so-youre-teaching-everything-youre-supposed-to/feed/ 0 For many new teachers, lesson planning ALONE is a huge source of stress and anxiety. Not only is there a billion other things to do as a teacher, but there's the tiny detail of knowing how and what to plan. Yes, you definitely learned about it and even did some practice lesson plans. But now that you're faced with your own students (and possibly teaching a grade that you weren't prepared for), it's a whole new ballgame. In this episode, I don't tell you how to plan - I explain the mindset and big-picture view of planning an entire year, then down to quarters, units, and daily lessons. You can help make this podcast better! Please click the button below to complete this survey so that I can discuss the topics that matter to you most! TAKE ME TO THE SURVEY! Want to ask a question and be featured on the podcast? Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by asking a question! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter Love this show? SUPPORT THE PODCAST! Some of you may remember me mentioning this, but when I switched from teaching band to English, I had a friend, Deb, who gave me everything she ever used to teach 7th-grade English. She actually vouched for me when we were convincing my principal to let me switch over. Deb ended up switching to 8th grade English and I took her spot. And since she was such a strong teacher, I definitely wanted EVERYTHING so that I wouldn’t have to start from scratch. I can’t express enough how helpful it was to have all of her materials. It gave me an idea of what I should be teaching, how to teach it, how long I should take, and what to expect from my 7th-grade students. Over time, I tweaked those lessons based on my teaching style and student population, and eventually, I stopped. But they were a really good basis for figuring out HOW to teach English. What I didn’t get from the beginning was a big-picture view of where my students needed to go. Because of this, they could do random skills well, but not enough to put them together successfully and produce a quality product. So today I want to go over how to do that so that your lessons and planning don’t feel aimless and haphazard. Map out the year by starting with the end in mind Use a regular calendar that shows the days in each month, not a planner with daily pages. Take out any curriculum or pacing guides that you MUST use plus a list of your content-level standards On your calendar, write down holidays, breaks, and other non-student days Also write down any finals, other assessments, and state testing Decide which SKILLS the most important. Notice I didn’t say standards. That comes later. First, I want you to get really clear on what you want your students to be able to demonstrate knowledge of and skill in. For me, I focus on writing and literary analysis standards. I want my students to be able to write a RACE paragraph, either for literature or nonfiction. I want them to have a solid topic sentence for each body paragraph, evidence that directly supports that topic sentence, and an explanation of how each piece of evidence supports and is relevant to the topic. I want them to write an introduction that contains a hook, a preview of the topic, and a thesis statement. Those are just my top writing skills, and there are obviously literature ones, but I won’t go into those. In real life, I want my students to be able to communicate their thoughts effectively through writing. That means that I want them to write coherent sentences, stay away from too many cliches and idioms, For many new teachers, lesson planning ALONE is a huge source of stress and anxiety. Not only is there a billion other things to do as a teacher, but there's the tiny detail of knowing how and what to plan. Yes, For many new teachers, lesson planning ALONE is a huge source of stress and anxiety. Not only is there a billion other things to do as a teacher, but there's the tiny detail of knowing how and what to plan. Yes, you definitely learned about it and even did some practice lesson plans. But now that you're faced with your own students (and possibly teaching a grade that you weren't prepared for), it's a whole new ballgame. In this episode, I don't tell you how to plan - I explain the mindset and big-picture view of planning an entire year, then down to quarters, units, and daily lessons.<br /> You can help make this podcast better! Please click the button below to complete this survey so that I can discuss the topics that matter to you most!<br /> TAKE ME TO THE SURVEY!<br /> Want to ask a question and be featured on the podcast?<br /> Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by asking a question!<br /> <br /> Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more!<br /> Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show?<br /> You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com<br /> Connect with me<br /> <br /> Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher<br /> Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live<br /> Message me through Instagram or Twitter<br /> <br /> Love this show?<br /> SUPPORT THE PODCAST!<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Some of you may remember me mentioning this, but when I switched from teaching band to English, I had a friend, Deb, who gave me everything she ever used to teach 7th-grade English. She actually vouched for me when we were convincing my principal to let me switch over. Deb ended up switching to 8th grade English and I took her spot. And since she was such a strong teacher, I definitely wanted EVERYTHING so that I wouldn’t have to start from scratch.<br /> <br /> I can’t express enough how helpful it was to have all of her materials. It gave me an idea of what I should be teaching, how to teach it, how long I should take, and what to expect from my 7th-grade students. Over time, I tweaked those lessons based on my teaching style and student population, and eventually, I stopped. But they were a really good basis for figuring out HOW to teach English.<br /> <br /> What I didn’t get from the beginning was a big-picture view of where my students needed to go. Because of this, they could do random skills well, but not enough to put them together successfully and produce a quality product. So today I want to go over how to do that so that your lessons and planning don’t feel aimless and haphazard.<br /> Map out the year by starting with the end in mind<br /> Use a regular calendar that shows the days in each month, not a planner with daily pages.<br /> <br /> Take out any curriculum or pacing guides that you MUST use plus a list of your content-level standards<br /> <br /> On your calendar, write down holidays, breaks, and other non-student days<br /> <br /> Also write down any finals, other assessments, and state testing<br /> <br /> Decide which SKILLS the most important. Notice I didn’t say standards. That comes later. First, I want you to get really clear on what you want your students to be able to demonstrate knowledge of and skill in.<br /> <br /> For me, I focus on writing and literary analysis standards. I want my students to be able to write a RACE paragraph, either for literature or nonfiction. I want them to have a solid topic sentence for each body paragraph, evidence that directly supports that topic sentence, and an explanation of how each piece of evidence supports and is relevant to the topic. I want them to write an introduction that contains a hook, a preview of the topic, and a thesis statement. Those are just my top writing skills, and there are obviously literature ones, but I won’t go into those. Kim Lepre clean 24:19