Job Interview Series

TnT 57 How to highlight your strengths while answering any interview question

During an interview, it’s important to find a way to showcase our strengths. But how can we do it without necessarily bragging, and how can we do it in the context of the questions? Similarly, if you’re asked about a negative experience in your teaching, how can you frame your answer to put you in a positive light? Ross Cooper gives fabulous tips on how to answer interview questions from the lens of a principal.

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Click HERE for a copy of all of the interview questions from this series!

  1. Tell us about yourself and what brings you here today.
  2. Why are you a good fit for our organization?
  3. How do you grow professionally?
  4. Talk to us about a time in which you learned from an experience via a mistake.
  5. What do you do in your free time?

Where you can find Ross Cooper:

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TnT 56 How to answer authentically while still impressing in job interviews

New teachers looking for that first teaching job are often worried about their lack of experience when doing their first round of interviews. How can they talk about their experiences when they’ve only finished student teaching? Should they be upfront or pad their experiences? Rick Mohrien explains how newer teachers can still be authentic while still making a good impression on the interview panel.

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Click HERE for a copy of all of the interview questions from this series!

  1. Tell me your story, how did you end up here today wanting to be a teacher here at Winget Park?
  2. What’s the best lesson you ever taught, and tell me why it was the best lesson?
  3. It’s the first week of school, tell me what you’re doing to build relationships with your students.
  4. It’s the first week of school, tell me what you’re doing with your students’ families.
  5. How do you help yourself grow as a learner? What are some things you like to do to support your own professional growth outside the required professional development?

Where you can find Rick Mohrien:


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Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching!

Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more!

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TnT 55 What to say in an interview when you don’t know the answer to a question

So you’ve sent in your resume, and finally got a call for an interview. AWESOME! You put on your most professional-looking outfit, walk in tall, shake hands firmly, and finally sit down for those questions. But what if you don’t know the answer to a question? What should you say? Should you lie? What if you said, “I don’t know?” Would you look like an idiot?

Rob Fulk asks me some compelling interview questions that I wasn’t necessarily ready for (but did my best to think on the fly), and he gives advice to new teachers on how to answer difficult questions.

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Click HERE for a copy of all of the interview questions from this series!

  1. What do you know about our school?
  2. What’s more important to education in the success of our students – tradition or innovation? Defend your answer.
  3. What perspectives outside of a Euro-centric curriculum can you bring to our classrooms?
  4. Can you give me specific examples in an ELA classroom of literature you would bring in from a non-Euro perspective?
  5. What specific supports are you going to need to be successful in our building?
  6. What are your expectations of a team/PLC, and how do you uphold your expectations of your team/PLC?

Where you can find Rob Fulk:


Don’t forget to leave a voicemail!

Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching!

Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more!

Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show?

You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com

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TnT 54 Your resume and education aren’t the most important factors when landing a teaching position

Teachers often spend quite a bit of time polishing and perfecting their resumes, but is that what really gets them a job? What if a teacher has limited experience – do they still have a shot when they’re up against more seasoned veterans? Resumes are only one small factor in the hiring process (but PLEASE spellcheck!), and personality and fit are the biggest ones. Scott Schwartz discusses which personality traits tend to predict success in any job, as well as how his district eliminates the “gut feeling” factor and relies on data.

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Click HERE for a copy of all of the interview questions from this series!

  1. Tell me about a difficult circumstance that you handled, what action did you take, and what were the results?
  2. What is the difference between a good teacher and a great teacher?
  3. A student in your class consistently causes disruptions. Explain the steps you take to help the child and maintain your positive classroom environment.
  4. Do you believe that placing a zero in the grade book teaches responsibility?
  5. Describe your understanding of what a standards-based learning environment looks like.

Where you can find Scott Schwartz:


Don’t forget to leave a voicemail!

Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching!

Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more!

Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show?

You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com

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TnT 53 Don’t forget to do your research before an interview!

When teachers prepare to apply for jobs, they polish their resume, many create a portfolio of curriculum and experiences, and most scour the internet for interview questions (which you no longer have to do because of this series!). But do you research the schools for which you’re interviewing? Do you know the ethos and culture of that school? In today’s interview, Asia Cunnigham discusses why you MUST do your due diligence and research a school in the same way that any administrator will research YOU.

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Click HERE for a copy of all of the interview questions from this series!

  1. Tell me about you and your teaching experience with your cooperating teacher.
  2. Tell me about how you empower students to become involved in their learning process in the classroom.
  3. As a teacher, how do you build relationships equitably with all the students in your environment so that they’re able to demonstrate mastery and reach their maximum potential?
  4. What is a typical day in your literacy classroom look like?
  5. Tell me what you do in terms of your students that are unmotivated. What does that look like?
  6. How do you ensure parental involvement in their learning process in your classroom?
  7. What ways are you a collaborative working colleague?

Where you can find Asia Cunningham:


Don’t forget to leave a voicemail!

Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching!

Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more!

Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show?

You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com

Connect with me