Podcast

TnT 33 You’re cheating yourself when you let your students get away with not doing any work

Every teacher is faced with one or several students each year who just refuse to do any work. No matter what they try, these students slouch in their seats and avoid all attempts to produce any evidence of learning. Many teachers give up on these students eventually and just let them fail. But what if they didn’t? Here are some reasons why YOU as their teacher deserve much more from these students and why you should keep persisting until they do.

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You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com

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TnT 32 How to tackle grading when you’re waaay behind

Do you have piles of assignments that need grading? Are you feeling overwhelmed by it? You’re not alone! All teachers find themselves buried in grading at some point, and it can seem like there’s no way out of it. While there’s probably no way around having to sit down and do the dirty work, here are some tips to do it efficiently as well as avoid getting into this situation again.

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Steps for getting your grading under control

  • Commit to being organized
  • Stop adding assignments (seriously!)
  • Reconsider how you grade
  • Set aside blocks of time
  • Streamline your feedback

Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show?

You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com

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TnT 31 Ray Steinmetz reveals how to personalize math and make it meaningful for students

Math teachers are tasked with teaching students concepts that they’ll use for life while also getting past students’ fixed mindset of, “I hate math, and I suck at it.” How can teachers keep students motivated and engaged in a Common Core world? Ray Steinmetz explains how personalizing learning, setting up strong systems for formative assessment, and using targeted interventions will produce huge math gains. We also discuss advice for new teachers on what to focus those first years of teaching.

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How to get in touch with Ray:

Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show?

You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com

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TnT 30 Here’s what to do when your lessons just aren’t working

Regardless of how long you’ve been teaching, there will be many moments when your lessons just don’t seem to be working. This is especially frustrating when you’ve taken time to plan the “perfect” lesson or unit, and the students still can’t grasp the concept! When this happens, it can be a valuable learning experience if you take the right steps to correct your course.

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5 steps (in order) to making it better next time:

  • Don’t blame the students
  • Take responsibility
  • Reevaluate
  • Use something that has worked before
  • Ask for help

Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show?

You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com

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TnT 29 How to best handle an angry parent email

Every teacher will receive at least one (if not more) emailed from disgruntled parents. Regardless of who’s at fault, it can be a nerve-wracking experience and have lasting negative effects if not handled properly. How can we address the email in a diplomatic way without having to compromise our class policies and dignity? I provide 10 steps on how to handle the email so that the situation doesn’t escalate to the point where the parent becomes angrier and you set off red flags with your administration.

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Steps for handling an angry parent email:

1) Investigate the issue the parent is upset about.

2) Take a moment to understand the parent’s perspective.

3) Have another colleague take a look at it.

4) If you feel compelled to, draft your angry reply in a different medium

5) Give your principal a heads up.

6) No matter what, you’ll need to respond, but stay cool.

7) After crafting that email, save it as a draft and come back to it when you’re not upset.

8) Don’t blame or lecture the student the next day.

9) Find a way to prevent this issue from popping up again.

10) If you’re delivering unhappy news, have another colleague take a look at it.

Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show?

You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com

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